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17 March 2015
The Lancet Publishes CSL Behring’s Kcentra® Phase III Data
— CSL Behring today announced that The Lancet has published results from a Phase III clinical study showing Kcentra® (Prothrombin Complex Concentrate [Human]) to be superior to plasma for the urgent reversal of acquired coagulation factor deficiency induced by vitamin K antagonist (VKA, e.g., warfarin) therapy in adult patients needing an urgent surgery or invasive procedure. Kcentra is the first and only non-activated 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for this use and for the urgent reversal of warfarin therapy in adult patients with acute major bleeding. More.

02 February 2015
U.S. FDA Accepts for Review CSL Behring’s Biologics License Application for
rIX-FP for Hemophilia B Patients

CSL Behring announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review its Biologics License Application (BLA) for the marketing authorization of its long-acting fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP). Upon FDA approval, rIX-FP will provide hemophilia B patients with a long-acting treatment option with dosing intervals up to 14 days. More.

02 February 2015
FDA Approves New Dosing Option for CSL Behring’s Hizentra®
CSL Behring announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the administration options for Hizentra®, Immune Globulin Subcutaneous (Human), 20% Liquid, to include the ability to individualize therapy with flexible dosing – treatment at regular intervals from daily to once every two weeks (biweekly) – for people with primary immunodeficiency (PI). Self-administered subcutaneously, Hizentra delivers consistent levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG) regardless of dosing schedule.  Hizentra, the first and only 20 percent subcutaneous immunoglobulin, received FDA approval in March 2010 as a once-weekly IgG replacement therapy to help protect people with PI against infections and was approved for biweekly (once every two weeks) dosing in September 2013. More.

16 December 2014
CSL Behring Submits Biologics License Application for FDA Approval of Recombinant Fusion Protein Linking Coagulation Factor IX with Recombinant Albumin (rIX-FP) for Hemophilia B Patients
CSL Behring announced today it has submitted a biologics license application (BLA) to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the marketing authorization of its long-acting fusion protein linking recombinant coagulation factor IX with recombinant albumin (rIX-FP). Once approved by the FDA, rIX-FP (Coagulation Factor IX {Recombinant}, Albumin Fusion Protein) will provide people with hemophilia B and their physicians a long-acting treatment option with dosing intervals up to 14 days. More.

08 December 2014
One Woman's Story: Living and Helping Others with Inherited Lung Disorder
(Family Features) Wheezing, shortness of breath and chronic bronchitis are often associated with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, they are also symptoms of a serious genetic form of emphysema called Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency, also known as Alpha-1. More.

04 December 2014
CSL Issues “Our Corporate Responsibility 2014” Report
CSL Behring’s parent company CSL Limited (ASX:CSL) has issued its annual corporate responsibility report – “Our Corporate Responsibility 2014.” The report details the global biopharmaceutical company’s performance across key priority areas from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 – recording another strong performance led by CSL Behring. More.

01 December 2014
CMS Extends New Technology Add-On Payment for CSL Behring’s Kcentra®
CSL Behring today announced that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has extended the new technology add-on payment (NTAP) for Kcentra® (Prothrombin Complex Concentrate [Human]) through September 2015 for eligible Medicare beneficiaries treated in the inpatient hospital setting. Kcentra, the first and only non-activated 4-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC) approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), is indicated for the urgent reversal of acquired coagulation factor deficiency induced by Vitamin K antagonist (VKA, e.g., warfarin) therapy in adult patients with acute major bleeding or in need of an urgent surgery or invasive procedure. Kcentra, first approved for use in the U.S. in April 2013, received its NTAP designation effective October 1, 2013. More.

29 October 2014
CSL Behring Announces Winners of its 13th Annual Gettin’ in the GameSM Junior National Championship Program
CSL Behring announced that William McCarthy from the Western Pennsylvania Chapter of the National Hemophilia Foundation and Nicholas Cleghorn from the Bleeding Disorders Advocacy Network are the national winners of the 2014 Gettin' in the GameSM Junior National Championship (JNC) program in golf and baseball, respectively. The JNC, launched in 2002, is CSL Behring’s annual baseball and golf competition that encourages kids to remain active despite the challenges a bleeding disorder can pose, while allowing them to develop life-long connections with other members of the community. More.

28 October 2014
CSL BEHRING SIGNS STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT WITH ENABLE INJECTIONS TO MARKET NOVEL NEW DRUG DELIVERY DEVICE
CSL Behring announced today that its affiliate company, CSL Behring AG, of Bern, Switzerland and Enable Injections, LLC, of Franklin, Ohio have signed a long-term development agreement for a new and innovative drug delivery system intended to improve the comfort, convenience and treatment compliance for patients with rare and serious diseases. More.

13 October 2014
PLASMA DONORS RECOGNIZED DURING INTERNATIONAL PLASMA AWARENESS WEEK FOR HELPING SAVE LIVES
CSL Behring and its subsidiary, CSL Plasma, join the Plasma Protein Therapeutics Association (PPTA) in saluting the contributions of plasma donors during International Plasma Awareness Week (IPAW), celebrated October 12-18. More.

30 September 2014
CSL Behring Expands Manufacturing Facility in Kankakee, Illinois to Meet Patients' Growing Needs
CSL Behring announced that it is set to commence operations in its newly expanded facility now that the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has granted approval. The expansion significantly increases plasma processing and albumin production capacity in the Kankakee, Ill. facility. More.

18 August 2014
Early Diagnosis of Children with Primary Immunodeficiencies Focus of National Awareness Campaign for School Nurses
School nurses reach 98 percent of the 50,000,000 students in U.S. public schools, grades k-12, and are uniquely positioned to facilitate the early diagnosis of serious medical conditions such as primary immunodeficiency (PI). More.

20 May 2014
CSL Behring Launches Hizentra® Co-Pay Relief Program
People managing primary immunodeficiency (PI) with CSL Behring’s Hizentra® (Immune Globulin Subcutaneous [Human]) may now be eligible for financial support through the Hizentra® Co-Pay Relief Program. The new program offers eligible U.S. patients up to $4,000 per year to be applied toward Hizentra co-payments, deductibles and coinsurance. Out-of-pocket therapy costs will be processed seamlessly through the electronic billing systems of specialty pharmacies and physician offices, which means no paperwork is required for the patient, pharmacist or physician. More.

07 May 2014
Feature Story: A Mother's Health
Learning you have a rare, chronic medical condition can be unsettling, frustrating and downright scary. For primary immunodeficiency (PI) patient Rebecca Johnson, 33, it also made her question whether she could realize her dream of becoming a mother. More.

Important Safety Information for Hizentra

Immune Globulin Subcutaneous (Human), Hizentra®, treats various forms of primary immunodeficiency (PI) in patients age 2 and over.

WARNING: Thrombosis (blood clotting) can occur with immune globulin products, including Hizentra. Risk factors can include: advanced age, prolonged immobilization, a history of blood clotting or hyperviscosity (blood thickness), use of estrogens, installed vascular catheters, and cardiovascular risk factors.

If you are at high risk of thrombosis, your doctor will prescribe Hizentra at the minimum dose and infusion rate practicable and will monitor you for signs of thrombosis and hyperviscosity. Always drink sufficient fluids before administration.

Tell your doctor if you have had a serious reaction to other immune globulin medicines or have been told you also have a deficiency of the immunoglobulin called IgA, as you might not be able to take Hizentra. You should not take Hizentra if you know you have hyperprolinemia (too much proline in your blood).

Infuse Hizentra under your skin only; do not inject into a blood vessel.

Allergic reactions can occur with Hizentra. If your doctor suspects you are having a bad allergic reaction or are going into shock, treatment will be discontinued. Immediately tell your doctor or go to the emergency room if you have signs of such a reaction, including hives, trouble breathing, wheezing, dizziness, or fainting.

Tell your doctor about any side effects that concern you. Immediately report symptoms that could indicate a blood clot, including pain and/or swelling of an arm or leg, with warmth over affected area; discoloration in arm or leg; unexplained shortness of breath; chest pain or discomfort that worsens with deep breathing; unexplained rapid pulse; and numbness or weakness on one side of the body. Your doctor will also monitor symptoms that could indicate hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), and other potentially serious reactions that have been seen with Ig treatment, including aseptic meningitis syndrome (brain swelling); kidney problems; and transfusion-related acute lung injury.

The most common drug-related adverse reactions in the clinical trial for Hizentra were swelling, pain, redness, heat or itching at the site of injection; headache; back pain; diarrhea; tiredness; cough; rash; itching; nausea and vomiting.

Hizentra is made from components of human blood. The risk of transmission of infectious agents, including viruses and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent, cannot be completely eliminated.

Before being treated with Hizentra, inform your doctor if you are pregnant, nursing or plan to become pregnant. Vaccines (such as measles, mumps and rubella) might not work well if you are using Hizentra. Before receiving any vaccine, tell the healthcare professional you are being treated with Hizentra.

Please see full prescribing information for Hizentra, including boxed warning and the patient product information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.


Important Safety Information for Kcentra

Kcentra®, Prothrombin Complex Concentrate (Human), is a blood coagulation factor replacement product indicated for the urgent reversal of acquired coagulation factor deficiency induced by Vitamin K antagonist (VKA—eg, warfarin) therapy in adult patients with acute major bleeding or the need for urgent surgery or other invasive procedure. Kcentra is for intravenous use only.

WARNING: ARTERIAL AND VENOUS THROMBOEMBOLIC COMPLICATIONS

Patients being treated with Vitamin K antagonist therapy have underlying disease states that predispose them to thromboembolic events. Potential benefits of reversing VKA should be weighed against the risk of thromboembolic events, especially in patients with history of such events. Resumption of anticoagulation therapy should be carefully considered once the risk of thromboembolic events outweighs the risk of acute bleeding. Both fatal and nonfatal arterial and venous thromboembolic complications have been reported in clinical trials and postmarketing surveillance. Monitor patients receiving Kcentra, and inform them of signs and symptoms of thromboembolic events. Kcentra was not studied in subjects who had a thromboembolic event, myocardial infarction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, cerebral vascular accident, transient ischemic attack, unstable angina pectoris, or severe peripheral vascular disease within the prior 3 months. Kcentra might not be suitable for patients with thromboembolic events in the prior 3 months.

Kcentra is contraindicated in patients with known anaphylactic or severe systemic reactions to Kcentra or any of its components (including heparin, Factors II, VII, IX, X, Proteins C and S, Antithrombin III and human albumin). Kcentra is also contraindicated in patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Because Kcentra contains heparin, it is contraindicated in patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT).

Hypersensitivity reactions to Kcentra may occur. If patient experiences severe allergic or anaphylactic type reactions, discontinue administration and institute appropriate treatment.

In clinical trials, the most frequent (≥2.8%) adverse reactions observed in subjects receiving Kcentra were headache, nausea/vomiting, hypotension, and anemia. The most serious adverse reactions were thromboembolic events, including stroke, pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

Kcentra is derived from human plasma. The risk of transmission of infectious agents, including viruses and, theoretically, the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent, cannot be completely eliminated.

The safety and efficacy of Kcentra in pediatric use have not been studied, and Kcentra should be used in women who are pregnant or nursing only if clearly needed.

Please see full prescribing information for Kcentra.


MTL/07-12-0002(1) 9/2014
© 2015 CSL Behring